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#1 Angoid

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:57 AM

I've recently repartitioned my PC's hard drive to give Ubuntu a go. So now I have triple boot between Windows 10 (32-bit), Windows 10 (64-bit) and Ubuntu (64-bit) running the Unity Desktop environment.

Linux is all fairly new to me, but the first thing is to be able to do things in Linux that I've taken for granted in Windows.

For example - file searching. The Everything search tool and another favourite of mine on Windows is Agent Ransack.
The latter one has very powerful in-file searching capabilities including regular expressions.

So these need replacing on Linux if not natively available.

A bit of Googling about has turned up this site - that's the result page for 7-zip alternatives.
It lets you select what sort of licence (free, open source, commercial) and allow you to search.
Their database seems quite good.

Thought I'd post it here for those looking to come to grips with Linux if they're familiar with Windows, but actually it cuts both ways.

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#2 ranchhand

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 03:26 PM

Good man, Angus.  I really have to install a drive dedicated to Linux; I was thinking of something which is supposedly easier for a Windows user, like Mint. I am pretty good with Knoppix, but that is a virtual distro and I assume more simple than an installation version. So far are you finding your way around Ubuntu ok?


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#3 LinuxSam

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 05:25 PM

I'm not familiar with those search tools you use but basically you can do very powerful searches using just the command-line. But I guess you want something with a nice window and options to check and places to write things in... I will look into what might be available.

/LinuxSam

#4 Angoid

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 08:14 PM

I'll be attempting to find my way around Ubuntu, time, wife and daughter permitting!

 

I do know some command lines (such as the grep command and the find command), very powerful commands and am not 'afraid' of the command line and in some cases actually prefer it as it's more flexible.

 

But sometimes it's nice to have a GUI application that you can just launch and use.


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#5 ranchhand

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 10:16 PM

Ok, so....I am getting an education here; does Ubuntu requires a lot of command line executions?


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#6 Angoid

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 10:09 AM

I think every flavour of Linux does require some command line knowledge in order to use it properly.  You could get by as a regular user without it, but to do anything really cool and/or techie, I think it's useful, yes.

 

Sometimes, there is a GUI way to do things but at other times, the command line is quickest.  For example, to update your system, it's often easier to fire up a command line prompt and enter these two commands:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

'sudo' means to run the command as super-user.  You will typically be prompted for your password before the command runs.  It's a bit like "Run as Administrator" under Windows.

'apt-get' calls Aptitude, the package manager.  This is how programs are installed and removed under Linux (whether a GUI calls it or you run it manually)

'update' says to update files on your system known as the repository.  It will not actually update anything other than those files

'upgrade' reads the updated repository files and performs the actual updates.

 

That's just one example that barely scratches the surface really.

 

Debian uses it and so does Ubuntu.  Other flavours of Linux are probably not too different but they can and do differ (for example, the 'pet' commands you use in Puppy Linux).


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If you don't know what eschatology is then don't worry; it's not the end of the world.
Please do not send uninvited PMs requesting support; post into the appropriate forum instead and we'll all learn. See our Private messaging policy.