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C++ Ascendant or In Decline


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#1 beau

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:46 AM

I've recently heard two conflicting opinions on the current status of C++. One self-proclaimed expert says C++ has come to be specially respected, and is regarded as a kind of gold star language . . the other says C++ going out of use and is no longer a significant player.

 

I'm not an IT professional, or even hobbyist, so you could fool me, but just out of curiosity I'd like to know which it is . . or something in between?

 



#2 Angoid

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 03:18 PM

This is definitely an "it depends on who you ask" question.

There is a lot of software out there that uses C++, so until this is all gone there will always be a call for C++ developers to modify and enhance it.
A good way to gauge how popular a language is would be to google it followed by the word "jobs" (for example, C++ jobs) and see what you get and what kind of money is being offered.
I don't think C++ is in its ascendancy as it's quite a well-established language now - the question is whether it is being superseded by c# and other 'object-oriented' languages.
I'd personally say it's on a plateau, neither on its way up or on the way out.

Nowadays, there is no "go-to" language in that if you know it, you'll be in immediate demand. You need a range of language experiences to get into software development these days.
And many companies don't even look at you if you only have hobbyist experience: they want folk who have 2 or 3 years' experience at least.

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#3 ranchhand

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 04:57 PM

Just out of curiosity....what are one-player games coded in now?  I am not talking about online, just games on a CD and saved to a local HDD. It used to be C, didn't it?  I am not including the little flash games that can be played.


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#4 Angoid

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 08:23 AM

Must confess, I don't know for sure but probably a highly portable language such as Java.
Java works by compiling your source code into something known as bytecode. You then have a bytecode interpreter for every platform the language supports, and run it from there.
In that way, your source code can be platform-agnostic.
Java bytecode is well-defined, with its own instruction set and syntax:
https://en.wikipedia...i/Java_bytecode

Python is up and coming, it is a scripting language (what we used to call an interpreted language). Some Linux utilities (for example, the system cleaner BleachBit (which you can think of as being a kind of Linux equivalent of Ccleaner)) is actually a Python script.
It is a very full-featured language that is gaining popularity and use, especially in RPi environments.

There is still some call for C, bit it has been largely superseded by C++ and c#.

Many one-player games need to run on various platforms nowadays, from desktop PCs through to tablets as well as online.
The number of platforms (hardware and software) that must be supported is growing all the time.

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#5 beau

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 12:57 PM

Ach! I used the wrong phrase :angry:, I should have said "in a position of specially high regard" instead of "in ascendency"



#6 Angoid

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 08:01 AM

Hmmmmm, not sure. Not sure whether I'd consider any language to be in higher regard than any other language,
Different languages are better suited to different purposes. It's more down to what you want to do more than anything else.

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#7 ranchhand

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 02:24 PM

..then there are languages in DEcendency; I broke my mind on Fortran and Cobol in college, now Cobol is antiquity, and I guess some form of Fortran is still used in technical fields to a limited extent. Everyone was predicting that Pascal was going to be the huge language of the future, and I guess it fizzled. I guess as technology progresses, new languages are created to service it.


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#8 Angoid

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 03:50 PM

At college, I also did COBOL, 8-bit Assembler (6502), BASIC and Pascal.
Now, there is pretty much zero call for these languages. But there is such a thing as Object-Oriented COBOL, but I'm not sure how much ground it has gained.

Back in the day, file handling (as it was called then) included data manipulation and if there is one thing that COBOL was especially good at it was data manipulation. It had a very powerful data structure mechanism that just wasn't there in other languages.
However, maths problems were clumsy ... PASCAL was better suited to that sort of thing.

Nowadays, there are many languages all which interface to each other. There is no single "go to" language for any given field.

You'll almost certainly have to learn SQL for data manipulation and a whole bunch of other stuff.

Sure, many languages use similar concepts so if you learn one "curly-brace" language, you'll be able to pick other curly-brace languages easily enough.

Object-oriented is the way forward - learn any object-oriented language (Java, C#, etc) and take it from there. C is not object-oriented but C++ is.

Object-Oriented Programming

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